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Yikes, don’t lose your credibility by misusing these words

I know I have had a slip up or two, which is always a humbling moment…and we don’t want errors happen to you! Here are some of the most misused words, according to ezinearticles.com:

affect vs. effect

affect – To have an effect on; make a difference to; an emotion or desire.

Incorrect: Chocolate effects my behavior.
Correct: Chocolate affects my behavior.

effect – To bring about; to cause something to happen; a change that is a result of an action or cause.

Incorrect: Chocolate has an incredible affect on behavior.
Correct: Chocolate has an incredible effect on behavior.

allot vs. a lot

allot – To give or to apportion something to someone as a share or a task.

Incorrect: I will a lot 3 prizes to the winners.
Correct: I will allot 3 prizes to the winners.

a lot – (never alot) A large amount, very many; also, very much.

Incorrect: I like monkeys allot. There are alot of them at the zoo.
Correct: I like monkeys a lot. There are a lot of them at the zoo.

Please note the context of a piece of land or lot, as in “a lot”, is also acceptable; however, it’s not a common usage error.

then vs. than

then – At that time; at the time in question; after that, next, afterward.

Incorrect: I went to the zoo and than to the park.
Correct: I went to the zoo and then to the park.

than – Used in expressions when introducing an exception or contrast.

Incorrect: Bob is shorter then Ralph.
Correct: Bob is shorter than Ralph.

lie vs. lay

lie – To be in or assume a horizontal or resting position; the way, direction, or position in which something lies.

Please note we will not be discussing “lie”, i.e. to tell a falsehood or to fib, because it’s not a common usage error.

Incorrect: I am going to lay down for a nap.
Correct: I am going to lie down for a nap.

lay – To put down (generally carefully or gently); the general appearance of an area.

Incorrect: I am going to lie the baby down for a nap.
Correct: I am going to lay the baby down for a nap.

desert vs. dessert

desert – To abandon; a dry, barren area of land; barren.

Incorrect: The nomads desserted the dessert in search of water.
Correct: The nomads deserted the desert in search of water.

dessert – The sweet course at the end of the meal.

Incorrect: Did you see this low-fat and delicious desert recipe?
Correct: Did you see this low-fat and delicious dessert recipe?

To see more, check it out here!

Filed under english language writing grammer

0 notes

Yikes, don’t lose your credibility by misusing these words

I know I have had a slip up or two, which is always a humbling moment…and we don’t want errors happen to you! Here are some of the most misused words, according to ezinearticles.com:

affect vs. effect

affect – To have an effect on; make a difference to; an emotion or desire.

Incorrect: Chocolate effects my behavior.
Correct: Chocolate affects my behavior.

effect – To bring about; to cause something to happen; a change that is a result of an action or cause.

Incorrect: Chocolate has an incredible affect on behavior.
Correct: Chocolate has an incredible effect on behavior.

allot vs. a lot

allot – To give or to apportion something to someone as a share or a task.

Incorrect: I will a lot 3 prizes to the winners.
Correct: I will allot 3 prizes to the winners.

a lot – (never alot) A large amount, very many; also, very much.

Incorrect: I like monkeys allot. There are alot of them at the zoo.
Correct: I like monkeys a lot. There are a lot of them at the zoo.

Please note the context of a piece of land or lot, as in “a lot”, is also acceptable; however, it’s not a common usage error.

then vs. than

then – At that time; at the time in question; after that, next, afterward.

Incorrect: I went to the zoo and than to the park.
Correct: I went to the zoo and then to the park.

than – Used in expressions when introducing an exception or contrast.

Incorrect: Bob is shorter then Ralph.
Correct: Bob is shorter than Ralph.

lie vs. lay

lie – To be in or assume a horizontal or resting position; the way, direction, or position in which something lies.

Please note we will not be discussing “lie”, i.e. to tell a falsehood or to fib, because it’s not a common usage error.

Incorrect: I am going to lay down for a nap.
Correct: I am going to lie down for a nap.

lay – To put down (generally carefully or gently); the general appearance of an area.

Incorrect: I am going to lie the baby down for a nap.
Correct: I am going to lay the baby down for a nap.

desert vs. dessert

desert – To abandon; a dry, barren area of land; barren.

Incorrect: The nomads desserted the dessert in search of water.
Correct: The nomads deserted the desert in search of water.

dessert – The sweet course at the end of the meal.

Incorrect: Did you see this low-fat and delicious desert recipe?
Correct: Did you see this low-fat and delicious dessert recipe?

To see more, check it out here!

Filed under english language writing grammer